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9 hours, 59 minutes ago 0
Posted in: Blog

NapaLamb8

Previously unpublished remarks from Matt’s archive:

“I talked to a young woman today in my museum about the artist getting in touch with their own feelings about the finance end of art—the business end—versus the making of art. She asked me what I thought. My preaching blabber was all about the artist’s first and only thing they should do each and every day: get in touch with their artistic self. If everyone is painting a hula hoop, paint a smokestack. You don’t have to be like everyone else. An artist has a gift to be able to delve within their self, whether it’s articulated through art, poetry, music, silence, screaming, running… Whatever it is, it’s yours. Take it as a gift: a promise to yourself that you are you, and that you are comfortable with who you are. If you’re not, maybe you’re doing the wrong thing. If you can’t be comfortable within yourself, how can you be comfortable with doing anything else?”

3 days, 7 hours ago 0
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MattInSpain-February2011Previously unpublished remarks from Matt’s archive:

“What ‘they’ think doesn’t mean jack shit. What matters is doing what you know you should be doing. It might be singing, dancing, and painting at the same time. Wouldn’t that be fabulous? Will the world beat a path to your door? That I doubt!”

Pushing it out of the rut
5 days, 3 hours ago 0
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Previously unpublished remarks from Matt’s archive:

“A reader on my Blog asked whether I like painting better or doing the Umbrellas for Peace. That would be like asking me do I like my foot better than my leg. To me, everybody has a personal goal and objective. As we meditate, as we live our lives, we go down particular paths, which intersect with many others. We are making determinations about what we’re going to do. That doesn’t preclude us doing anything else, unless we get into a rut. To me, getting into a rut is truly the end of the line. So what do you do? Get out of the car, push it out of the rut, it doesn’t matter whether it goes to the left or the right. Don’t look for any nods yes or great admonishments no. Just do it and be done with it. And if you don’t like it, don’t do it next time.”

6 days, 4 hours ago 0
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Previously unpublished remarks from Matt’s archive:

“The thing I constantly ask the spirits for, and that they give me, is a sense of joy—which is wonderful unless I’m driving the car, sitting at the light surrounded by other cars, and I’m laughing my head off! I finally have to pull over the car and laugh for 10 minutes like a raving idiot! I love the outrageous, and I think the spirits are some of the most outrageous entities I’ve come across. May they forever haunt me!”

Gifts of joy from the spirits
1 week ago 0
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Previously unpublished remarks from Matt’s archive:

“Most of my encounters with the spirits are in the dream world. When I ask for favors such as joy and happiness, it usually comes at the most inopportune times! I think they’re just pulling my strings to make me believe in their power!”

A note from Sheila Lamb Gabler - July 17, 2014
1 week, 4 days ago 0
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A note from Sheila Lamb Gabler, President/CEO of Matt Lamb Studios:

Friends, I am being interviewed about the “World of Lamb” on “The Skinny & Houli Show” (http://skinnyhouli.com). Taping is Wednesday, July 30th, at Lizzie McNeill’s Irish Pub, 400 North McClurg Court, Chicago. You are invited to join us and watch the show. It runs just under an hour, and my interview will last about 15 minutes. The show will be broadcast on WCEV-1450AM on Saturday from 3:05 to 4pm, and Sunday from 8:05 to 9pm. It will be available on podcast the following Monday.

And here are some other events we have coming up in August and September: an art show in Kuwait; the opening of the Warhol/Lamb show and museum; an art show in Dubai, U.A.E.; an art show and Umbrellas for Peace in Berlin, Germany. Auction and show details for the remainder of 2014 to follow soon!

Peace!

Sheila

1 week, 5 days ago 0
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Rose Lamb Gabler - book cover
A note (continued) from Richard Speer, Blog/Facebook editor, about Rose Lamb Gabler’s new book:

“A third stylistic/thematic period for Matt came when he began viewing the antagonistic but integrated media in his Dip—oil and acrylic paints, turpentine, gesso, concrete—as symbolic of the ways in which people, even if they disagree vehemently, can still coexist peacefully. If diverse media can ultimately harmonize in a beautiful painting, cannot diverse populations live in harmony, despite cultural, racial, and religious beliefs? This evolution in Matt’s thinking illustrates how he was always thinking about the wider implications of his artwork. He was not wired to simply paint and let the paint speak for itself; as a born raconteur and a spiritual seeker, he was always looking at the wider context of what the media and technique represented symbolically. Paint-qua-paint was of limited interest to him. What made him tick was what a painting—or a process such as the Umbrellas for Peace—might tell us about ourselves. I think he would have very much agreed with Rose’s idea of paint, and people, having varied “drying times” within their lifespans.

To purchase “Life Lessons from Mr. McDick: A Tribute to Matt Lamb,” visit https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/439845.

Matt and Hats and Generations...
2 weeks ago 0
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A note from Richard Speer, Blog/Facebook editor:

In Rose Lamb Gabler’s new book about Matt, she makes an analogy between his “Dip” process and life in general. She talks about what The Dip could mean to different people and likens the drying time of a painting to the time we all take as human beings to grow and mature. I found this interpretation fascinating and very much in keeping with Matt’s own ways of drawing parallels between his paintings and human life. When he began painting, he painted animals and absurdist characters who wore bizarre hats. This was his way of critiquing people in power. The hat represented the preening and pretension of self-importance—a phenomenon Matt had encountered in the political and business worlds, and which was one of his lifelong pet peeves. In the middle of his painting career, he moved on to view his works as “generational.” The many layers of paint he added and excavated were analogous to the untold number of generations the preceded each of us: hidden in the past, but inextricably part of our present…

(to be continued)

A note from Sheila Lamb Gabler - July 11, 2014
2 weeks, 3 days ago 0
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A note from Sheila Lamb Gabler, President/CEO of Matt Lamb Studios:

Friends, as we move forward to further the legacy of Lamb, we would have never dreamed to be at this point—and now we are on a major upswing for peace through art! As my dad’s “right-hand person,” I have walked with him on this path, this journey, this mission. Soon I meet with Desmond Tutu (who painted one of our Umbrellas for Peace about a decade ago) to present him with a Lamb painting. At the same time, I was invited to meet with Bill and Hillary Clinton about our Lamb Umbrellas For Peace Program, as we enjoy the music from Sammy Hagar and John Legend at a private event for the peace process.

Another proud moment for the “World of Lamb” will be the opening of the Warhol/Lamb Museum in Slovokia, E.U. and then New York City, USA. As you all know, Matt had a vision, a mission, a foresight, and a dream as he beat the drum every day to bring new art into the world. Now we are seeing the global backing and support that he worked so hard for—for all of us, so that all people who have a voice through art can be heard. Matt would be proud! And we should be proud to be able to help with this movement!

Onward and upward!

—Sheila

2 weeks, 4 days ago 0
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A note from Richard Speer, Blog/Facebook Editor:

I am loving Rose Lamb Gabler’s description of Matt’s “Dip” process in her new book: “He believed that his works were a portal from our world to the world beyond ours. Therefore, his paintings were deeply rooted and embedded with spirits. It was similar to the idea: If you build it, they will come. So, he painted the canvases and the spirits would come.”

This points to the ways in which Matt was quite literally a visionary: He saw, as optically as he saw with his actual eyes, spirits in the mixture of caustic, antagonistic media in his Dip. One day while I was interviewing him in his Chicago studio, he showed me a painting I’d made the error of assuming was purely abstract. “No,” he said, “it may look abstract to you, but to me it’s figurative; I just haven’t drawn the figures yet. There are about thirty spirits in here that I can see as clearly as a Polaroid picture.” And then, to my astonishment, he pointed to their outlines. “You see that one there? And there’s a lurker over there. And there’s another…” And on and on, until he had shown me all thirty. And the stage for all these motley characters was the gooey, nuggetty, coagulated mess imparted on the canvases’ surfaces during The Dip. As Rose sums it up in her book, Matt built the stage, the ballpark, and the spirits showed up in droves.

To purchase “Life Lessons from Mr. McDick: A Tribute to Matt Lamb,” visit https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/439845.